Q2 2015 10-Q document
Table of Contents

 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q


þ
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2015
or
o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from __________ to__________
Commission file number 000-49728
JETBLUE AIRWAYS CORPORATION
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
 
87-0617894
(State of Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
 
 
27-01 Queens Plaza North, Long Island City, New York
 
11101
(Address of principal executive offices) 
 
 (Zip Code)
(718) 286-7900
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

N/A
(Former name, former address and former fiscal year,
if changed since last report)
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. þ Yes o No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). þ Yes o No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filer þ
 
Accelerated filer o
 
Non-accelerated filer o
 
Smaller reporting company o
 
 
 
 
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o           No þ
As of June 30, 2015, there were 314,814,479 shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock, par value $.01.
 


Table of Contents

JETBLUE AIRWAYS CORPORATION
FORM 10-Q
INDEX
 
Page
PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
 
 
PART II. OTHER INFORMATION
 


2

Table of Contents

PART 1. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

JETBLUE AIRWAYS CORPORATION
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(in millions, except share and per share data)
 
June 30, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
 
(unaudited)
 

ASSETS
 
 
 
CURRENT ASSETS
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
422

 
$
341

Investment securities
493

 
367

Receivables, less allowance (2015-$6; 2014-$6)
144

 
136

Prepaid expenses and other
346

 
356

Total current assets
1,405

 
1,200

PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT
 
 
 
Flight equipment
6,597

 
6,233

Predelivery deposits for flight equipment
176

 
207

 
6,773

 
6,440

Less accumulated depreciation
1,459

 
1,354

 
5,314

 
5,086

Other property and equipment
859

 
816

Less accumulated depreciation
276

 
252

 
583

 
564

Assets constructed for others
561

 
561

Less accumulated depreciation
150

 
139

 
411

 
422

Total property and equipment
6,308

 
6,072

OTHER ASSETS
 
 
 
Investment securities
56

 
60

Restricted cash
62

 
61

Other
486

 
446

Total other assets
604

 
567

TOTAL ASSETS
$
8,317

 
$
7,839

 
 
 
 
 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

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Table of Contents

JETBLUE AIRWAYS CORPORATION
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(in millions, except share and per share amounts)
 
June 30, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
 
(unaudited)
 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
 
 
 
CURRENT LIABILITIES
 
 
 
Accounts payable
$
266

 
$
208

Air traffic liability
1,136

 
973

Accrued salaries, wages and benefits
247

 
203

Other accrued liabilities
308

 
287

Current maturities of long-term debt and capital leases
229

 
265

Total current liabilities
2,186

 
1,936

 
 
 
 
LONG-TERM DEBT AND CAPITAL LEASE OBLIGATIONS
1,803

 
1,968

 
 
 
 
CONSTRUCTION OBLIGATION
480

 
487

 
 
 
 
DEFERRED TAXES AND OTHER LIABILITIES
 
 
 
Deferred income taxes
961

 
832

Other
94

 
87

 
1,055

 
919

STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
 
 
 
Preferred stock, $0.01 par value; 25,000,000 shares authorized, none issued

 

Common stock, $0.01 par value; 900,000,000 shares authorized, 380,760,466 and 368,883,960 shares issued and 314,814,479 and 309,871,309 shares outstanding at June 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014, respectively
4

 
4

Treasury stock, at cost; 65,945,987 and 59,012,651 shares at June 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014, respectively
(259
)
 
(125
)
Additional paid-in capital
1,781

 
1,711

Retained earnings
1,291

 
1,002

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(24
)
 
(63
)
Total stockholders’ equity
2,793

 
2,529

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
$
8,317

 
$
7,839




See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

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Table of Contents

JETBLUE AIRWAYS CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(unaudited, in millions, except per share amounts)

 
 
Three Months Ended June 30,
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2015
 
2014
OPERATING REVENUES
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Passenger
 
$
1,496

 
$
1,372

 
$
2,904

 
$
2,602

Other
 
116

 
121

 
231

 
240

Total operating revenues
 
1,612

 
1,493

 
3,135

 
2,842

OPERATING EXPENSES
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Aircraft fuel and related taxes
 
371

 
497

 
706

 
961

Salaries, wages and benefits
 
375

 
316

 
750

 
645

Landing fees and other rents
 
90

 
83

 
173

 
160

Depreciation and amortization
 
81

 
77

 
168

 
155

Aircraft rent
 
31

 
31

 
62

 
62

Sales and marketing
 
70

 
69

 
130

 
123

Maintenance materials and repairs
 
126

 
102

 
239

 
196

Other operating expenses
 
186

 
177

 
372

 
358

Total operating expenses
 
1,330

 
1,352

 
2,600

 
2,660

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
OPERATING INCOME
 
282

 
141

 
535

 
182

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest expense
 
(32
)
 
(39
)
 
(66
)
 
(76
)
Capitalized interest
 
2

 
4

 
4

 
7

Interest income (expense) and other
 
(2
)
 
(3
)
 
(1
)
 
(3
)
Gain on sale of subsidiary
 

 
242

 

 
241

Total other income (expense)
 
(32
)
 
204

 
(63
)
 
169

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
INCOME BEFORE INCOME TAXES
 
250

 
345

 
472

 
351

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income tax expense
 
98

 
115

 
183

 
117

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
NET INCOME
 
$
152

 
$
230

 
$
289

 
$
234

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
EARNINGS PER COMMON SHARE:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
$
0.48

 
$
0.79

 
$
0.92

 
$
0.80

Diluted
 
$
0.44

 
$
0.68

 
$
0.84

 
$
0.69




See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

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Table of Contents


JETBLUE AIRWAYS CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(unaudited, in millions)
 
 
Three Months Ended June 30,
 
 
2015
 
2014
NET INCOME
 
$
152

 
$
230

Changes in fair value of derivative instruments, net of reclassifications into earnings (net of $17 and $4 of taxes in 2015 and 2014, respectively)
 
26

 
6

Total other comprehensive income (loss)
 
26

 
6

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
 
$
178

 
$
236



 
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
 
2015
 
2014
NET INCOME
 
$
289

 
$
234

Changes in fair value of derivative instruments, net of reclassifications into earnings (net of $25 and $3 of taxes in 2015 and 2014, respectively)
 
39

 
4

Total other comprehensive income (loss)
 
39

 
4

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
 
$
328

 
$
238



See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

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Table of Contents

JETBLUE AIRWAYS CORPORATION
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(unaudited, in millions)
 
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
 
2015
 
2014
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
 
 
 
 
Net income
 
$
289

 
$
234

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
 
 
Deferred income taxes
 
131

 
107

Depreciation
 
138

 
133

Amortization
 
30

 
28

Stock-based compensation
 
10

 
12

Losses on sale of assets, debt extinguishment, and customer contract termination
 
(8
)
 
3

Gain on sale of subsidiary
 

 
(241
)
Collateral returned for derivative instruments
 
39

 
1

Changes in certain operating assets and liabilities
 
254

 
240

Other, net
 
7

 
24

Net cash provided by operating activities
 
890

 
541

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
 
 
 
 
Capital expenditures
 
(372
)
 
(310
)
Predelivery deposits for flight equipment
 
(34
)
 
(70
)
Proceeds from sale of subsidiary
 

 
391

Purchase of held-to-maturity investments
 
(267
)
 
(134
)
Proceeds from the maturities of held-to-maturity investments
 
187

 
146

Purchase of available-for-sale securities
 
(175
)
 
(335
)
Proceeds from the sale of available-for-sale securities
 
130

 
364

Other, net
 
1

 
(3
)
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities
 
(530
)
 
49

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
 
 
 
 
Proceeds from:
 
 
 
 
Issuance of common stock
 
57

 
9

Issuance of long-term debt
 

 
307

Repayment of long-term debt and capital lease obligations
 
(178
)
 
(587
)
Acquisition of treasury stock
 
(163
)
 
(82
)
Other, net
 
5

 
(8
)
Net cash used in financing activities
 
(279
)
 
(361
)
INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
 
81

 
229

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
 
341

 
225

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
 
$
422

 
$
454



See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

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Table of Contents

JETBLUE AIRWAYS CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(unaudited)
June 30, 2015

NOTE 1 - SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Basis of Presentation
JetBlue predominately provides air transportation services across the United States, the Caribbean and Latin America. Our condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of JetBlue Airways Corporation, or JetBlue, and our subsidiaries which are collectively referred to as “we” or the “Company”. All majority-owned subsidiaries are consolidated on a line by line basis, with all intercompany transactions and balances having been eliminated. In June 2014, LiveTV, LLC (and LTV Global, Inc, and LiveTV International, Inc., subsidiaries of LiveTV, LLC) were sold to Thales Holding Corporation, or Thales, and ceased to be subsidiaries of JetBlue. In September 2014, LiveTV Satellite Communications, LLC was sold to Thales and ceased to be a subsidiary of JetBlue. Following the close of the sales on June 10, 2014 and September 25, 2014, the transferred LiveTV operations are no longer presented in our condensed consolidated financial statements. These condensed consolidated financial statements and related notes should be read in conjunction with our 2014 audited financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2014, or our 2014 Form 10-K.
These condensed consolidated financial statements are unaudited and have been prepared by us following the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC. In our opinion they reflect all adjustments, including normal recurring items, that are necessary to present fairly the results for interim periods. Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, or U.S. GAAP, have been condensed or omitted as permitted by such rules and regulations; however, we believe that the disclosures are adequate to make the information presented not misleading. Operating results for the periods presented herein are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for other interim periods or the entire fiscal year.
Investment securities
Investment securities consist of available-for-sale investment securities and held-to-maturity investment securities. We use a specific identification method to determine the cost of the securities when they are sold.
Held-to-maturity investment securities. The contractual maturities of the corporate bonds we held as of June 30, 2015 were not greater than 24 months. We did not record any significant gains or losses on these securities during the three and six months ended June 30, 2015 or 2014. The estimated fair value of these investments approximated their carrying value as of June 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014, respectively.
The carrying values of investment securities consisted of the following at June 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014 (in millions):
 
 
June 30, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
 
 
(unaudited)
 
 
Available-for-sale securities
 
 
 
 
Time deposits
 
$
125

 
$
125

Commercial paper
 
45

 

 
 
170

 
125

Held-to-maturity securities
 
 
 
 
Time deposits
 
$

 
$
48

Corporate bonds
 
379

 
254

 
 
379

 
302

 
 
 
 
 
Total
 
$
549

 
$
427



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Table of Contents

New Accounting Pronouncements
In August 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued ASU 2014-15, Presentation of Financial Statements - Going Concern, Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity's Ability to Continue as a Going Concern topic of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. This standard provides specific guidance that requires management to evaluate whether there are conditions or events, considered in the aggregate, that raise substantial doubt about the entity’s ability to continue as a going concern within one year after the date that the financial statements are issued. This amendment is effective for the annual period ending after December 15, 2016 and for annual periods and interim periods thereafter; early adoption is permitted. The impact of this standard on our disclosures will be dependent on our financial condition at the time of adoption.
In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers topic of the Codification, which supersedes existing revenue recognition guidance. Under the new standard, a company will recognize revenue when it transfers goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the company expects to be entitled to in exchange for those goods or services. The standard allows for either full retrospective or modified retrospective adoption. In July 2015, the FASB voted to defer the effective date of ASU 2014-09 by one year to interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017 and permitted early adoption of the standard, but not prior to December 15, 2016. While we are still evaluating the full impact of adopting this standard on our condensed consolidated financial statements and disclosures, we have determined that it will impact our loyalty program accounting. The new standard will no longer allow us to use the incremental cost method when recording the financial impact of TrueBlue points earned on JetBlue purchases and will require us to re-value our liability with a relative fair value approach.

NOTE 2 — SHARE-BASED COMPENSATION
During the six months ended June 30, 2015, 1.9 million restricted stock units vested and 0.9 million restricted stock units were granted under our 2011 Incentive Compensation Plan. In addition, 3.6 million stock options were exercised under our 2002 Stock Incentive Plan during the six months ended June 30, 2015. We have not granted any stock options since 2008 and all previously granted stock options were fully expensed in 2012.
At our Annual Shareholders Meeting held on May 21, 2015, our shareholders approved amendments to the 2011 Incentive Compensation Plan and the 2011 Crewmember Stock Purchase Plan increasing the number of shares of Company common stock that remain available for issuance under each plan by 7.5 million and 15.0 million, respectively.


NOTE 3 — LONG TERM DEBT, SHORT TERM BORROWINGS, AND CAPITAL LEASE OBLIGATIONS
During the six months ended June 30, 2015, we made scheduled principal payments of $94 million on our outstanding long-term debt and capital lease obligations. In June 2015, we prepaid $52 million of outstanding principal relating to seven Airbus A320 aircraft; as a result, one aircraft became unencumbered and six have lower principal balances. During June 2015, we also prepaid the full $32 million principal outstanding on a special facility revenue bond for JFK that was issued by the New York City Industrial Development Agency in December 2006. During the second quarter of 2015, holders voluntarily converted approximately $26 million in principal amount of the Series B 5.5% convertible debentures, and as a result, we issued 5.8 million shares of our common stock.
Aircraft, engines, other equipment and facilities with a net book value of $3.14 billion at June 30, 2015 have been pledged as security under various loan agreements. As of June 30, 2015, we owned, free of encumbrance, 35 Airbus A320 aircraft, 11 Airbus A321 aircraft and 34 spare engines. At June 30, 2015, the weighted average interest rate of all of our long-term debt and capital lease obligations was 4.6% and scheduled maturities were $142 million for the remainder of 2015, $455 million in 2016, $196 million in 2017, $207 million in 2018, $224 million in 2019 and $808 million thereafter.

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Table of Contents

The carrying amounts and estimated fair values of our long-term debt at June 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014 were as follows (in millions):
 
 
June 30, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
 
 
Carrying Value
 
Estimated Fair Value
 
Carrying Value
 
Estimated Fair Value
 
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
 
 
 
Public Debt
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Floating rate enhanced equipment notes:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Class G-1, due 2016
 
$
32

 
$
31

 
$
35

 
$
35

    Class G-2, due 2016
 
186

 
182

 
185

 
180

Fixed rate special facility bonds, due through 2036
 
43

 
44

 
77

 
78

6.75% convertible debentures due in 2039
 
86

 
368

 
86

 
283

5.5% convertible debentures due in 2038
 
42

 
196

 
68

 
241

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Non-Public Debt
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fixed rate enhanced equipment notes, due through 2023
 
$
207

 
$
212

 
$
217

 
$
224

Floating rate equipment notes, due through 2025
 
252

 
256

 
276

 
277

Fixed rate equipment notes, due through 2026
 
1,021

 
1,096

 
1,119

 
1,211

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total*
 
$
1,869

 
$
2,385

 
$
2,063

 
$
2,529

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
*Total excludes capital lease obligations of $163 million for June 30, 2015 and $170 million for December 31, 2014.

The estimated fair values of our publicly held long-term debt are classified as Level 2 in the fair value hierarchy. The fair values of our enhanced equipment notes and our special facility bonds were based on quoted market prices in markets with low trading volumes. The fair value of our convertible debentures were based on other observable market inputs since they are not actively traded. The fair value of our non-public debt was estimated using a discounted cash flow analysis based on our borrowing rates for instruments with similar terms and therefore classified as Level 3 in the fair value hierarchy. The fair values of our other financial instruments approximate their carrying values. Refer to Note 9 for an explanation of the fair value hierarchy structure.
We have financed certain aircraft with Enhanced Equipment Trust Certificates (EETCs) as one of the benefits is being able to finance several aircraft at one time, rather than individually. The structure of EETC financing is that we create pass-through trusts in order to issue pass-through certificates. The proceeds from the issuance of these certificates are then used to purchase equipment notes which are issued by us and are secured by our aircraft. These trusts meet the definition of a variable interest entity, or VIE, as defined in the Consolidations topic of the FASB Codification, and must be considered for consolidation in our condensed consolidated financial statements. Our assessment of our EETCs considers both quantitative and qualitative factors including the purpose for which these trusts were established and the nature of the risks in each. The main purpose of the trust structure is to enhance the credit worthiness of our debt obligation through certain bankruptcy protection provisions, liquidity facilities and lower our total borrowing cost. We concluded that we are not the primary beneficiary in these trusts because our involvement in them is limited to principal and interest payments on the related notes, the trusts were not set up to pass along variability created by credit risk to us and the likelihood of our defaulting on the notes. Therefore, we have not consolidated these trusts in our condensed consolidated financial statements.


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NOTE 4 — ACCUMULATED OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)
Comprehensive income (loss) includes changes in fair value of our aircraft fuel derivatives and interest rate swap agreements, which qualify for hedge accounting. A rollforward of the amounts included in the accumulated other comprehensive income (loss), net of taxes for the three months ended June 30, 2015 and June 30, 2014 are as follows (in millions, unaudited):
 
 
Aircraft Fuel
Derivatives (1)
 
Interest Rate
Swaps (2)
 
Total
Beginning accumulated losses at March 31, 2015
 
$
(50
)
 
$

 
$
(50
)
Reclassifications into earnings (net of $13 of taxes)
 
18

 

 
18

Change in fair value (net of $4 of taxes)
 
8

 

 
8

Ending accumulated losses at June 30, 2015
 
$
(24
)
 
$

 
$
(24
)
 
 
Aircraft Fuel
Derivatives (1)
 
Interest Rate
Swaps (2)
 
Total
Beginning accumulated losses at March 31, 2014
 
$
(1
)
 
$
(1
)
 
$
(2
)
Reclassifications into earnings (net of $2 of taxes)
 

 
1

 
1

Change in fair value (net of $2 of taxes)
 
5

 

 
5

Ending accumulated income at June 30, 2014
 
$
4

 
$

 
$
4

__________________________
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1) Reclassified to aircraft fuel expense
 
 
 
 
 
 
(2) Reclassified to interest expense
 
 
 
 
 
 

A rollforward of the amounts included in the accumulated other comprehensive income (loss), net of taxes for the six months ended June 30, 2015 and June 30, 2014 are as follows (in millions, unaudited):

 
 
Aircraft Fuel
Derivatives (1)
 
Interest Rate
Swaps (2)
 
Total
Beginning accumulated losses at December 31, 2014
 
$
(63
)
 
$

 
$
(63
)
Reclassifications into earnings (net of $26 of taxes)
 
40

 

 
40

Change in fair value (net of $(1) of taxes)
 
(1
)
 

 
(1
)
Ending accumulated losses at June 30, 2015
 
$
(24
)
 
$

 
$
(24
)

 
 
Aircraft Fuel
Derivatives (1)
 
Interest Rate
Swaps (2)
 
Total
Beginning accumulated income (losses) at December 31, 2013
 
$
1

 
$
(1
)
 
$

Reclassifications into earnings (net of $2 of taxes)
 
1

 
1

 
2

Change in fair value (net of $1 of taxes)
 
2

 

 
2

Ending accumulated income at June 30, 2014
 
$
4

 
$

 
$
4

__________________________
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1) Reclassified to aircraft fuel expense
 
 
 
 
 
 
(2) Reclassified to interest expense
 
 
 
 
 
 



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NOTE 5 — EARNINGS PER SHARE
The following table shows how we computed basic and diluted earnings per common share (in millions, unaudited):
 
 
Three Months Ended June 30,
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2015
 
2014
Numerator:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
 
$
152

 
$
230

 
$
289

 
$
234

Effect of dilutive securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest on convertible debt, net of income taxes and profit sharing
 
1

 
3

 
2

 
5

Net income applicable to common stockholders after assumed conversions for diluted earnings per share
 
$
153

 
$
233

 
$
291

 
$
239

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Denominator:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Weighted average shares outstanding for basic earnings per share
 
316.9

 
293.5

 
313.6

 
294.2

Effect of dilutive securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Employee stock options and restricted stock units
 
2.7

 
2.0

 
3.0

 
2.2

Convertible debt
 
28.0

 
48.4

 
30.4

 
48.3

Adjusted weighted average shares outstanding and assumed conversions for diluted earnings per share
 
347.6

 
343.9

 
347.0

 
344.7

 
 
Three Months Ended June 30,
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2015
 
2014
Shares excluded from EPS calculation (in millions):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Shares issuable upon conversion of our convertible debt as assumed conversion would be antidilutive
 

 

 

 

Shares issuable upon exercise of outstanding stock options or vesting of restricted stock units as assumed exercise would be antidilutive
 

 
9.5

 

 
10.7

As of June 30, 2015, a total of approximately 1.4 million shares of our common stock, which were lent to our share borrower pursuant to the terms of our share lending agreement as described more fully in Note 2 to our 2014 Form 10-K, were issued and outstanding for corporate law purposes. Holders of the borrowed shares have all the rights of a holder of our common stock. However, because the share borrower must return all borrowed shares to us (or identical shares or, in certain circumstances of default by the counterparty, the cash value thereof), the borrowed shares are not considered outstanding for the purpose of computing and reporting basic or diluted earnings per share. The fair value of similar common shares not subject to our share lending arrangement based upon our closing stock price at June 30, 2015, was approximately $28 million.
As discussed in Note 3, in April 2015 holders voluntarily converted approximately $26 million in principal amount of the 5.5% convertible debentures. As a result, we issued 5.8 million shares of our common stock.
On June 16, 2015, JetBlue entered into an accelerated share repurchase, or ASR, agreement with Goldman, Sachs & Co. paying $150 million for an initial delivery of approximately 6.1 million shares. The initial delivery of shares will be subject to an adjustment at the end of the term of the agreement. Ultimately, the total shares purchased by JetBlue as a result of the agreement will be based on the volume weighted average prices of JetBlue's common stock during the term of the ASR which is expected to be completed by the end of the third quarter 2015.


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NOTE 6 — EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT PLAN
We sponsor a retirement savings 401(k) defined contribution plan, or the Plan, covering all of our employees where we match employee contributions of up to 5% of eligible wages. Our non-management employees receive a discretionary contribution of 5% of eligible wages, which we refer to as Retirement Plus. They are also eligible to receive profit sharing, calculated as 15% of pre-tax income adjusted for profit sharing and special items with the result reduced by Retirement Plus contributions. Certain Federal Aviation Administration, or FAA-licensed employees, receive an additional contribution of 3% of eligible compensation, which we refer to as Retirement Advantage. Total 401(k) company match, Retirement Plus, profit sharing, and Retirement Advantage expensed for the three months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 was $58 million and $23 million, respectively, while the total amount expensed for the Plan for the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 was $111 million and $47 million, respectively.

NOTE 7 — COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
As of June 30, 2015, our firm aircraft orders consisted of 27 Airbus A321 aircraft, 25 Airbus A320 new engine option (A320neo) aircraft, 45 Airbus A321neo aircraft, 24 EMBRAER 190 aircraft and 10 spare engines scheduled for delivery through 2023. Committed expenditures for these aircraft and related flight equipment, including estimated amounts for contractual price escalations and predelivery deposits, will be approximately $320 million for the remainder of 2015, $540 million in 2016, $585 million in 2017, $510 million in 2018, $935 million in 2019 and $3.5 billion thereafter. We are scheduled to receive six new Airbus A321 aircraft during the remainder of 2015.
As part of the sale of LiveTV, refer to Note 10, a $3 million liability relating to Airfone was assigned to JetBlue under the purchase agreement. Separately, prior to the sale of LiveTV, JetBlue had an agreement with ViaSat Inc. through 2020 relating to in-flight broadband connectivity technology on our aircraft. That agreement stipulated a $20 million minimum commitment for the connectivity service and a $25 million minimum commitment for the related hardware and software purchases. As part of the sale of LiveTV, these commitments to ViaSat Inc. were assigned to LiveTV and JetBlue entered into two new service agreements with LiveTV pursuant to which LiveTV will provide in-flight entertainment and connectivity services to JetBlue for a minimum of seven years.
As of June 30, 2015, we have approximately $34 million in assets serving as collateral for letters of credit relating to a certain number of our leases. These are included in restricted cash and expire at the end of the related lease terms. Additionally, we had approximately $25 million pledged related to our workers compensation insurance policies and other business partner agreements which will expire according to the terms of the related policies or agreements.
Environmental Liability
In 2012, during performance of required environmental testing, the presence of light non-aqueous phase petroleum liquid was discovered in certain subsurface monitoring wells on the property at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK). Our lease with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, or PANYNJ, provides that under certain circumstances we may be responsible for investigating, delineating, and remediating such subsurface contamination, even if we are not necessarily the party that caused its release. We engaged environmental consultants to assess the extent of the contamination and to assist us in determining steps to remediate it. A preliminary estimate indicated costs of remediation could range from approximately $1 million up to $3 million. As of June 30, 2015, we have accrued $1 million for current estimates of remediation costs, which is included in current liabilities on our condensed consolidated balance sheets. However, as with any environmental contamination, there is the possibility this contamination could be more extensive than presently estimated at this stage. We have a pollution insurance policy that protects us against these types of environmental liabilities, which we expect will mitigate some of our exposure in this matter.
Based upon information currently known to us, we do not expect this environmental proceeding to have a material adverse effect on our condensed consolidated balance sheets, results of operations, or cash flows. However, it is not possible to predict with certainty the impact of future environmental compliance requirements or the costs of resolving this matter, in part because the scope of the remediation that may be required is not certain and environmental laws and regulations are subject to modification and changes in interpretation.

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Legal Matters
Occasionally, we are involved in various claims, lawsuits, regulatory examinations, investigations and other legal matters arising, for the most part, in the ordinary course of business. The outcome of litigation and other legal and regulatory matters is always uncertain. The Company believes it has valid defenses to the legal or regulatory matters currently pending against it, is defending itself vigorously and has recorded accruals determined in accordance with U.S. GAAP, where appropriate. In making a determination regarding accruals, using available information, we evaluate the likelihood of an unfavorable outcome in legal and regulatory proceedings to which we are a party and record a loss contingency when it is probable a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. These subjective determinations are based on the status of such legal or regulatory proceedings, the merits of our defenses and consultation with legal counsel. Actual outcomes of these legal and regulatory proceedings may materially differ from our current estimates. While it is possible that resolution of one or more of the matters currently pending or threatened could result in losses material to our consolidated results of operations, liquidity or financial condition to date, none of these types of litigation matters, most of which are typically covered by insurance, has had a material impact on our operations or financial condition. We have insured and continue to insure against most of these types of claims. A judgment on any claim not covered by, or in excess of, our insurance coverage could materially adversely affect our financial condition or results of operations.
Employment Agreement Dispute. In or around March 2010, attorneys representing a group of current and former pilots (the “Claimants”) filed a Request for Mediation with the American Arbitration Association (the “AAA”) concerning a dispute over the interpretation of a provision of their individual JetBlue Airways Corporation Employment Agreement for Pilots (“Employment Agreement”).  In their Fourth Amended Arbitration Demand, dated June 8, 2012, the Claimants (972 pilots) alleged that JetBlue breached the base salary provision of the Employment Agreement and sought back pay and related damages for pay adjustments that occurred in each of 2002, 2007 and 2009. The Claimants also asserted that JetBlue had violated numerous New York state labor laws. In July 2012, in response to JetBlue's partial motion to dismiss, the Claimants withdrew the 2002 claims. Following an arbitration hearing on the remaining claims, in May 2013, the arbitrator issued an interim decision on the contractual provisions of the Employment Agreement. The arbitrator determined that a 26.7% base pay rate increase provided to certain pilots during 2007 triggered the base salary provision of the Employment Agreement.  The 2009 claims and all New York state labor law claims were dismissed.  In early July 2014, the AAA issued the arbitrator’s Final Award, awarding 318 of the 972 Claimants a total of approximately $4.4 million, including interest, from which applicable tax withholdings must be further deducted. In January 2015, the New York State Supreme Court confirmed the arbitrator's Final Award and denied the Claimants' motion to vacate the award. The Claimants have appealed.
As the amount of damages awarded to the Claimants in the Final Award has been confirmed by the Court, we have accrued an amount that we believe is probable. Our estimate of reasonably possible losses in excess of the probable loss is not material. However, the outcome of any litigation is inherently uncertain and any final judgment may differ materially.
ALPA. In April 2014, JetBlue pilots elected to be solely represented by the Air Line Pilots Association, or ALPA. The National Mediation Board, or NMB, certified ALPA as the representative body for JetBlue pilots and we plan to work with ALPA to reach our first collective bargaining agreement. We do not expect the result of the election to have a material impact on our financial condition.


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NOTE 8 — FINANCIAL DERIVATIVE INSTRUMENTS AND RISK MANAGEMENT
As part of our risk management techniques, we periodically purchase over the counter energy derivative instruments and enter into fixed forward price agreements, or FFPs, to manage our exposure to the effect of changes in the price of aircraft fuel. Prices for the underlying commodities have historically been highly correlated to aircraft fuel, making derivatives of them effective at providing short-term protection against sharp increases in average fuel prices. We also periodically enter into jet fuel basis swaps for the differential between heating oil and jet fuel, to further limit the variability in fuel prices at various locations.
To manage the variability of the cash flows associated with our variable rate debt, we have also entered into interest rate swaps. We do not hold or issue any derivative financial instruments for trading purposes.
Aircraft fuel derivatives
We attempt to obtain cash flow hedge accounting treatment for each aircraft fuel derivative that we enter into. This treatment is provided for under the Derivatives and Hedging topic of the Codification which allows for gains and losses on the effective portion of qualifying hedges to be deferred until the underlying planned jet fuel consumption occurs, rather than recognizing the gains and losses on these instruments into earnings during each period they are outstanding. The effective portion of realized aircraft fuel hedging derivative gains and losses is recognized in aircraft fuel expense in the period during which the underlying fuel is consumed.
Ineffectiveness occurs, in certain circumstances, when the change in the total fair value of the derivative instrument differs from the change in the value of our expected future cash outlays for the purchase of aircraft fuel. Ineffectiveness is recognized immediately in interest income and other. If a hedge does not qualify for hedge accounting, the periodic changes in its fair value are also recognized in interest income and other. When aircraft fuel is consumed and the related derivative contract settles, any gain or loss previously recorded in other comprehensive income is recognized in aircraft fuel expense. All cash flows related to our fuel hedging derivatives are classified as operating cash flows.
Our current approach to fuel hedging is to enter into hedges on a discretionary basis without a specific target of hedge percentage needs. We view our hedge portfolio as a form of insurance to help mitigate the impact of price volatility and protect us against severe spikes in oil prices, when possible.
The following table illustrates the approximate hedged percentages of our projected fuel usage by quarter as of June 30, 2015 related to our outstanding fuel hedging contracts that were designated as cash flow hedges for accounting purposes.
 
 
Jet fuel swap
agreements
 
Jet fuel collar agreements
 
Heating oil collar agreements
 
Total
Third Quarter 2015
 
5
%
 
%
 
9
%
 
14
%
Fourth Quarter 2015
 
5
%
 
%
 
10
%
 
15
%

Interest rate swaps
The interest rate hedges we had outstanding as of June 30, 2015 effectively swap floating rate debt for fixed rate debt. They take advantage of lower borrowing rates in existence at the time of the hedge transaction as compared to the date our original debt instruments were executed. As of June 30, 2015, we had $32 million in notional debt outstanding related to these swaps, which cover certain interest payments through August 2016. The notional amount decreases over time to match scheduled repayments of the related debt.
All of our outstanding interest rate swap contracts qualify as cash flow hedges in accordance with the Derivatives and Hedging topic of the Codification. Since all of the critical terms of our swap agreements match the debt to which they pertain, there was no ineffectiveness relating to these interest rate swaps in 2015 or 2014. All related unrealized losses were deferred in accumulated other comprehensive loss. We recognized an amount less than a million and approximately $1 million in additional interest expense in the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

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The table below reflects quantitative information related to our derivative instruments and where these amounts are recorded in our financial statements (dollar amounts in millions):
 
June 30,
2015
 
December 31,
2014
 
(unaudited)
 
 
Fuel derivatives
 
 
 
Longest remaining term (months)
6

 
12

Hedged volume (barrels, in thousands)
1,206

 
2,808

Liability fair value recorded in other accrued liabilities (1)
$
38

 
$
102

Estimated amount of existing losses expected to be reclassified into earnings in the next 12 months
(38
)
 
(102
)
Interest rate derivatives
 
 
 
Liability fair value recorded in other long term liabilities (2)
$
1

 
$
1

Estimated amount of existing losses expected to be reclassified into earnings in the next 12 months
(1
)
 
(1
)

 
Three Months Ended June 30,
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
2015
 
2014
 
2015
 
2014
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
Fuel derivatives
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hedge effectiveness losses recognized in aircraft fuel expense
$
(31
)
 
$
(2
)
 
$
(66
)
 
$
(3
)
Gains on derivatives not qualifying for hedge accounting recognized in other expense

 

 
1

 

Hedge ineffectiveness losses recognized in other expense

 

 

 

Hedge gains (losses) on derivatives recognized in comprehensive income
12

 
7

 
(2
)
 
3

Percentage of actual consumption economically hedged
20
%
 
15
%
 
20
%
 
16
%
Interest rate derivatives
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hedge losses on derivatives recognized in interest expense
$

 
$
(1
)
 
$

 
$
(1
)
Hedge gains (losses) on derivatives recognized in comprehensive income

 

 

 

____________________________
(1)
Gross asset or liability of each contract prior to consideration of offsetting positions with each counterparty
(2)
Gross liability, prior to impact of collateral posted

Any outstanding derivative instrument exposes us to credit loss in connection with our fuel contracts in the event of nonperformance by the counterparties to our agreements, but we do not expect that any of our counterparties will fail to meet their obligations. The amount of such credit exposure is generally the fair value of our outstanding contracts for which we are in a receivable position. To manage credit risks we select counterparties based on credit assessments, limit our overall exposure to any single counterparty and monitor the market position with each counterparty. Some of our agreements require cash deposits from either JetBlue or our counterparty if market risk exposure exceeds a specified threshold amount.
We have master netting arrangements with our counterparties allowing us the right of offset to mitigate credit risk in derivative transactions. The financial derivative instrument agreements we have with our counterparties may require us to fund all, or a portion of, outstanding loss positions related to these contracts prior to their scheduled maturities. The amount of collateral posted, if any, is periodically adjusted based on the fair value of the hedge contracts. Our policy is to offset the liabilities represented by these contracts with any cash collateral paid to the counterparties.

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The impact of offsetting derivative instruments is depicted below (in millions):
 
Gross Amount of Recognized
 
Gross Amount of Cash Collateral
 
Net Amount Presented
in Balance Sheet
 
Assets
 
Liabilities
 
Offset
 
Assets
 
Liabilities
As of June 30, 2015 (unaudited)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fuel derivatives
$

 
$
38

 
$
12

 
$

 
$
26

Interest rate derivatives

 
1

 
1

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
As of December 31, 2014
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fuel derivatives
$

 
$
102

 
$
51

 
$

 
$
51

Interest rate derivatives

 
1

 
1

 

 



NOTE 9 — FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
Under the Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures topic of the Codification, disclosures are required about how fair value is determined for assets and liabilities and a hierarchy for which these assets and liabilities must be grouped is established, based on significant levels of inputs as follows:
Level 1 quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities;
Level 2 quoted prices in active markets for similar assets and liabilities and inputs that are observable for the asset or liability; or
Level 3 unobservable inputs for the asset or liability, such as discounted cash flow models or valuations.
The determination of where assets and liabilities fall within this hierarchy is based upon the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. The following is a listing of our assets and liabilities required to be measured at fair value on a recurring basis and where they are classified within the fair value hierarchy as of June 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014 (in millions):
 
June 30, 2015
 
(unaudited)
 
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Level 3
 
Total
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash equivalents
$
245

 
$

 
$

 
$
245

Available-for-sale investment securities

 
170

 

 
170

 
$
245

 
$
170

 
$

 
$
415

Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Aircraft fuel derivatives
$

 
$
38

 
$

 
$
38

Interest rate swaps

 
1

 

 
1

 
$

 
$
39

 
$

 
$
39



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December 31, 2014
 
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Level 3
 
Total
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash equivalents
$
153

 
$

 
$

 
$
153

Available-for-sale investment securities

 
125

 

 
125

 
$
153

 
$
125

 
$

 
$
278

Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Aircraft fuel derivatives
$

 
$
102

 
$

 
$
102

Interest rate swaps

 
1

 

 
1

 
$

 
$
103

 
$

 
$
103

Refer to Note 3 for fair value information related to our outstanding debt obligations as of June 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014.
Cash equivalents
Our cash equivalents include money market securities which are readily convertible into cash and are considered to be highly liquid and easily tradable. These securities are valued using inputs observable in active markets for identical securities and are therefore classified as Level 1 within our fair value hierarchy.
Available-for-sale investment securities
Included in our available-for-sale investment securities are time deposits and commercial paper with maturities greater than 90 days but less than one year. The fair values of these instruments are based on observable inputs in non-active markets and are therefore classified as Level 2 in the hierarchy. We did not record any significant gains or losses on these securities during the three and six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014.
Aircraft fuel derivatives
Our aircraft fuel derivatives include swaps, collars, and basis swaps which are not traded on public exchanges. Heating oil and jet fuel are the products underlying these hedge contracts as they are highly correlated with the price of jet fuel. Their fair values are determined using a market approach based on inputs that are readily available from public markets for commodities and energy trading activities. Therefore, they are classified as Level 2 inputs. The data inputs are combined into quantitative models and processes to generate forward curves and volatilities related to the specific terms of the underlying hedge contracts.
Interest rate swaps    
The fair values of our interest rate swaps are based on inputs received from the related counterparty, which are based on observable inputs for active swap indications in quoted markets for similar terms. The fair values of these instruments are based on observable inputs in non-active markets and are therefore classified as Level 2 in the hierarchy.



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NOTE 10 — LIVETV
LiveTV, LLC, formerly a wholly owned subsidiary of JetBlue, provides inflight entertainment and connectivity solutions for various commercial airlines including JetBlue. On June 10, 2014, JetBlue sold LiveTV to Thales Holding Corporation for $393 million, net of purchase agreement adjustments including post-closing purchase price adjustments, which were finalized during the third quarter of 2014. The sale resulted in a pre-tax gain of approximately $241 million and is net of approximately $19 million in transactions costs for the year ended December 31, 2014.
The tax expense recorded in connection with this transaction totaled $72 million, net of $19 million tax benefit related to the utilization of a capital loss carryforward. The capital gain generated from the sale of LiveTV resulted in the release of a valuation allowance related to the capital loss deferred tax asset. This resulted in an after tax gain on the sale of approximately $169 million.
LiveTV operations are no longer being consolidated as a subsidiary in JetBlue's condensed consolidated financial statements. The effect of this change in reporting structure is not material to the financial statements presented.






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ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
OVERVIEW
Second Quarter 2015 Highlights
We had a $124 million increase in passenger revenue compared to the second quarter 2014 due to an 8.3% increase in revenue passengers as well as a 0.6% increase in the average fare.
Operating expense per available seat mile decreased by 8.6% to 10.86 cents, primarily due to a significant decline in aircraft fuel expenses and the reduction in expense related to the sale of LiveTV in 2014. Excluding fuel and profit sharing, our cost per available seat mile(1) increased by 0.6%.
Operating income reached $282 million, an increase of $141 million over the comparable period in 2014. This increase was principally driven by higher passenger revenue and a reduction in aircraft fuel expenses.
We generated $890 million in cash from operations for the six months ended June 30, 2015.

Balance Sheet
We ended the second quarter of 2015 with unrestricted cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments of $915 million and undrawn lines of credit of approximately $600 million. Our unrestricted cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments is approximately 15% of trailing twelve months revenue. We increased the number of unencumbered aircraft by four during the quarter by using cash on hand to pay for our deliveries and to prepay debt. We have 46 unencumbered aircraft and 34 unencumbered spare engines as of June 30, 2015.
Network
As part of our ongoing network initiatives and route optimization efforts, we continued to make schedule and frequency adjustments throughout the second quarter of 2015, including the announcement of daily service between Florida and Mexico City to begin in October 2015, and the introduction of additional Mint service between Boston and San Francisco beginning in March 2016.
Outlook for 2015
For the third quarter of 2015, cost per available seat mile, excluding fuel and profit sharing(1) is expected to increase between 1.0% and 3.0% over the comparable 2014 period. In addition, we expect operating capacity to increase between 8.5% and 10.5% over the comparable 2014 period.
For the full year 2015, we expect our operating capacity to increase between 7.0% and 9.0% over full year 2014 with the addition of six Airbus A321 aircraft to our operating fleet later this year. We expect the upper end of the operating capacity range to be more likely due to the strength of our completion factor as well as additional Mint offerings during the fourth quarter of 2015. We expect our cost per available seat mile, excluding fuel and profit sharing(1), for full year 2015 to increase between zero and 1.5% over full year 2014.
We introduced Fare Options on June 30, 2015 which enables us to dynamically price our product based on customer feedback. Customers currently have a choice to purchase tickets from three branded fares: Blue, Blue Plus, and Blue Flex. Each fare includes different offerings, such as free checked bags, reduced change fees, and additional TrueBlue points. We expect Fare Options to generate incremental operating income in future periods.






(1) Refer to our "Regulation G Reconciliation" note below for more information on this non-GAAP measure.


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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
Three Months Ended June 30, 2015 vs. 2014
Overview
We reported net income of $152 million, an operating income of $282 million and an operating margin of 17.5% for the three months ended June 30, 2015. This compares to net income of $230 million, an operating income of $141 million and an operating margin of 9.4% for the three months ended June 30, 2014. Diluted earnings per share were $0.44 for the second quarter of 2015 compared to $0.68 for the same period in 2014. Our 2014 results includes the gain from the sale of LiveTV, LLC. Excluding the gain(1), net income for the three months ended June 30, 2014 was $61 million and diluted earnings per share was $0.19.
On-time performance, as defined by the Department of Transportation, or DOT, is arrival within 14 minutes of scheduled arrival. In the second quarter of 2015, our systemwide on-time performance was 82.2% compared to 78.9% for the same period in 2014. Our on-time performance remains challenged by our concentration of operations in the northeast of the U.S., one of the world's most congested airspaces. Our completion factor was 99.3% in the second quarter of 2015 and 98.3% in the same period in 2014.


Operating Revenues
 
 
Three Months Ended June 30,
 
Year-over-Year
Change
 
(Revenues in millions; percent changes based on unrounded numbers)
 
2015
 
2014
 
$
 
%
 
Passenger Revenue
 
$
1,496

 
$
1,372

 
$
124

 
9.0

 
Other Revenue
 
116

 
121

 
(5
)
 
(4.6
)
 
Operating Revenues
 
$
1,612

 
$
1,493

 
$
119

 
7.9

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Average Fare
 
$
168.85

 
$
167.80

 
$
1.05

 
0.6

 
Yield per passenger mile (cents)
 
14.28

 
14.25

 
0.03

 
0.2

 
Passenger revenue per ASM (cents)
 
12.22

 
12.05

 
0.17

 
1.4

 
Operating revenue per ASM (cents)
 
13.17

 
13.12

 
0.05

 
0.4

 
Average stage length (miles)
 
1,085

 
1,088

 
(3
)
 
(0.3
)
 
Revenue passengers (thousands)
 
8,858

 
8,179

 
679

 
8.3

 
Revenue passenger miles (millions)
 
10,472

 
9,632

 
840

 
8.7

 
Available Seat Miles (ASMs) (millions)
 
12,237

 
11,386

 
851

 
7.5

 
Load Factor
 
85.6
%
 
84.6
%
 
 
 
1.0

pt.
Passenger revenue is our primary source of revenue, which includes seat revenue as well as revenue from our ancillary product offerings such as EvenMore™ Space. The increase in passenger revenue of $124 million, or 9.0%, for the three months ended June 30, 2015 compared to the same period in 2014 was primarily attributable to a 7.5% increase in capacity, 0.2% increase in the yield per passenger mile and a 1.0 point increase in load factor. Other revenue for the second quarter of 2014 included approximately $13 million related to our ownership of LiveTV, which was subsequently sold during 2014.







(1) Refer to our "Regulation G Reconciliation" note below for more information on this non-GAAP measure.

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Operating Expenses
In detail, our operating costs per available seat mile, or ASM, were as follows:
 
Three Months Ended June 30,
 
Year-over-Year
Change
 
Cents per ASM
(in millions; per ASM data in cents; percent changes based on unrounded numbers)
2015
 
2014
 
$
 
%
 
2015
 
2014
 
% Change
Aircraft fuel and related taxes
$
371

 
$
497

 
$
(126
)
 
(25.3
)
 
3.03

 
4.37

 
(30.7
)
Salaries, wages and benefits
375

 
316

 
59

 
18.7

 
3.06

 
2.78

 
10.1

Landing fees and other rents
90

 
83

 
7

 
7.0

 
0.74

 
0.73

 
1.4

Depreciation and amortization
81

 
77

 
4

 
5.5

 
0.66

 
0.68

 
(2.9
)
Aircraft rent
31

 
31

 

 
(0.7
)
 
0.25

 
0.27

 
(7.4
)
Sales and marketing
70

 
69

 
1

 
1.6

 
0.57

 
0.61

 
(6.6
)
Maintenance materials and repairs
126

 
102

 
24

 
23.0

 
1.03

 
0.90

 
14.4

Other operating expenses
186

 
177

 
9

 
4.9

 
1.52

 
1.54

 
(1.3
)
Total operating expenses
$
1,330

 
$
1,352

 
$
(22
)
 
(1.7
)%
 
10.86

 
11.88

 
(8.6
)%

Aircraft Fuel and Hedging
Aircraft fuel and related taxes decreased by $126 million, or 25.3%, for the three months ended June 30, 2015 compared to the same period in 2014. The average fuel price per gallon for the second quarter 2015 decreased by 30.9% to $2.13. This was partially offset by an increase of 8.1%, or 13 million gallons, in our fuel consumption and a 6.3% increase in the average number of aircraft operating during the second quarter 2015 as compared to the same period in 2014.
In addition, losses upon settlement of effective fuel hedges during the second quarter of 2015 were $30 million versus losses of $2 million during the same period in 2014.
Salaries, Wages and Benefits
Salaries, wages and benefits increased $59 million, or 18.7%, for the three months ended June 30, 2015 compared to the same period in 2014. It was our largest expense for the quarter, representing approximately 28% of our total operating expenses. The primary drivers were an increase in profit sharing which is based on adjusted pre-tax income as well as additional headcount.
Landing Fees and Other Rents
Landing fees and other rents increased $7 million, or 7.0%, for the three months ended June 30, 2015 compared to the same period in 2014, primarily due to increased departures and facility rate increases.
Depreciation and Amortization
Depreciation and amortization increased $4 million, or 5.5%, for the three months ended June 30, 2015 compared to the same period in 2014, primarily due to aircraft additions and facility improvements placed in service.
Maintenance Materials and Repairs
Maintenance materials and repairs increased $24 million, or 23.0%, for the three months ended June 30, 2015 compared to the same period in 2014, primarily driven by increased flight hours on our engine flight-hour based maintenance repair agreements and by the number of airframe heavy maintenance repairs.
Other Operating Expenses
Other operating expenses increased $9 million, or 4.9%, for the three months ended June 30, 2015 compared to the same period in 2014, primarily due to an increase in airport services and passenger on-board supplies resulting from increased passengers flown.


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Table of Contents

Six Months Ended June 30, 2015 vs. 2014
Overview
We reported net income of $289 million, an operating income of $535 million and an operating margin of 17.1% for the six months ended June 30, 2015. This compares to net income of $234 million, operating income of $182 million and an operating margin of 6.4% for the six months ended June 30, 2014. Diluted earnings per share was $0.84 for the six months ended June 30, 2015 compared to $0.69 for the same period in 2014. Our 2014 results include the gain from the sale of LiveTV, LLC. Excluding the gain(1), net income for the six months ended June 30, 2015 was $66 million and diluted earnings per share was $0.21.
Approximately 80% of our operations reside in the heavily populated northeast corridor of the U.S., which includes the New York and Boston metropolitan areas. During the first three months of 2014, this area experienced one of the coldest winters in 20 years, with New York and Boston each experiencing over 57 inches of snow. This led to the cancellation of approximately 4,100 flights in the first quarter of 2014 which negatively impacted our seat and ancillary revenues such as change fees, due to our policy of waiving them during severe weather events. During the first three months of 2015, a series of winter storms impacted this area, with Boston's Logan Airport experiencing record breaking snowfall totals. Despite the adverse weather conditions, our operational performance improved over the same period in 2014, resulting in approximately 37% fewer flight cancellations. We estimate that winter storms reduced our operating income by approximately $10 million in the first quarter of 2015 and $35 million in the first quarter of 2014.

Operating Revenues
 
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
Year-over-Year
Change
 
(Revenues in millions; percent changes based on unrounded numbers)
 
2015
 
2014
 
$
 
%
 
Passenger Revenue
 
$
2,904

 
$
2,602

 
$
302

 
11.6

 
Other Revenue
 
231

 
240

 
(9
)
 
(3.8
)
 
Operating Revenues
 
$
3,135

 
$
2,842

 
$
293

 
10.3

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Average Fare
 
$
171.29

 
$
167.75

 
$
3.54

 
2.1

 
Yield per passenger mile (cents)
 
14.45

 
14.22

 
0.23

 
1.6

 
Passenger revenue per ASM (cents)
 
12.28

 
11.93

 
0.35

 
2.9

 
Operating revenue per ASM (cents)
 
13.25

 
13.04

 
0.21

 
1.7

 
Average stage length (miles)
 
1,091

 
1,091

 

 

 
Revenue passengers (thousands)
 
16,953

 
15,512

 
1,441

 
9.3

 
Revenue passenger miles (millions)
 
20,093

 
18,294

 
1,799

 
9.8

 
Available Seat Miles (ASMs) (millions)
 
23,656

 
21,805

 
1,851

 
8.5

 
Load Factor
 
84.9
%
 
83.9
%
 
 
 
1.0

pt.
The increase in passenger revenues of $302 million, or 11.6%, for the six months ended June 30, 2015 compared to the same period in 2014 was mainly attributable to the 8.5% increase in capacity and 1.6% increase in the yield per passenger mile. Other revenue for the six months ended June 30, 2014 included approximately $30 million related to our ownership of LiveTV, which was subsequently sold during 2014.





(1) Refer to our "Regulation G Reconciliation" note below for more information on this non-GAAP measure.


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Table of Contents

Operating Expenses
In detail, operating costs per available seat mile were as follows (percent changes are based on unrounded numbers):
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
Year-over-Year
Change
 
 Cents per ASM
(in millions; per ASM data in cents; percent changes based on unrounded numbers)
2015
 
2014
 
$
 
%
 
2015
 
2014
 
% Change
Aircraft fuel and related taxes
$
706

 
$
961

 
$
(255
)
 
(26.5
)
 
2.99

 
4.41

 
(32.2
)
Salaries, wages and benefits
750

 
645

 
105

 
16.3

 
3.17

 
2.96

 
7.1

Landing fees and other rents
173

 
160

 
13

 
8.1

 
0.73

 
0.73

 

Depreciation and amortization
168

 
155

 
13

 
9.0

 
0.71

 
0.71

 

Aircraft rent
62

 
62

 

 
(1.3
)
 
0.26

 
0.28

 
(7.1
)
Sales and marketing
130

 
123

 
7

 
6.2

 
0.55

 
0.56

 
(1.8
)
Maintenance materials and repairs
239

 
196

 
43

 
22.0

 
1.01

 
0.90

 
12.2

Other operating expenses
372

 
358

 
14

 
3.4

 
1.57

 
1.65

 
(4.8
)
Total operating expenses
$
2,600

 
$
2,660

 
$
(60
)
 
(2.3
)%
 
10.99

 
12.20

 
(9.9
)%
Our operating expenses contain variable costs that decreased primarily due to a 32.6% decrease in average fuel cost per gallon.
Aircraft Fuel and Hedging
Aircraft fuel expense decreased $255 million, or 26.5%, for the six months ended June 30, 2015 compared to the same period in 2014,and represented approximately 27% of our total operating expenses. Fuel consumption increased by 28 million gallons or 9.0% mainly due to a 6.0% increase in the average number of operating aircraft in 2015 compared to 2014 as well as a 7.2% increase in departures. This was offset by a decrease in the average fuel cost per gallon from $3.11 in 2014 to $2.10 in 2015. Losses upon settlement of effective fuel hedges during 2015 were $65 million versus losses upon settlement of effective fuel hedges during the same period in 2014 of $3 million.
Salaries, Wages and Benefits
Salaries, wages and benefits increased $105 million, or 16.3%, for the six months ended June 30, 2015 compared to the same period in 2014. The primary driver was an increase in profit sharing which is based on adjusted pre-tax income as well as additional headcount. Our average number of full-time equivalent employees in the six months ended June 30, 2015 increased by 8.1% compared to the same period in 2014.
Landing Fees and Other Rents
Landing fees and other rents increased $13 million, or 8.1% for the six months ended June 30, 2015 as compared to the same period in 2014, primarily due to increased departures.
Depreciation and Amortization
Depreciation and amortization increased approximately $13 million, or 9.0%, for the six months ended June 30, 2015 compared to the same period in 2014, primarily due to having an average of 146 owned and capital leased aircraft in service in 2015 compared to 134 in 2014. Additionally, depreciation expense increased in 2015 due to the completion of our international arrivals facility and additional gates at T5, our terminal at JFK, which was completed in November 2014.
Sales and Marketing
Sales and marketing increased $7 million, or 6.2%, for the six months ended June 30, 2015 compared to the same period in 2014, primarily due to increased sales distribution costs associated with increased revenues.
Maintenance Materials and Repairs
Maintenance materials and repairs increased approximately $43 million, or 22.0%, for the six months ended June 30, 2015 compared to 2014, primarily driven by increased flight hours on our engine flight-hour based maintenance repair agreements and by the number of airframe heavy maintenance repairs.


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Table of Contents


Other Operating Expenses
Other operating expenses increased $14 million, or 3.4%, for the six months ended June 30, 2015 compared to 2014, primarily due to an increase in airport services and passenger on-board supplies resulting from increased passengers flown partially offset by a $9 million gain related to insurance recovery for a damaged engine.

The following table sets forth our operating statistics for the three and six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014:
 
 
Three Months Ended June 30,
 
Year-over-Year
Change
 
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
Year-over-Year
Change
 
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
%
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
%
 
Operating Statistics:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenue passengers (thousands)
 
8,858

 
8,179

 
8.3

 
 
16,953

 
15,512

 
9.3

 
Revenue passenger miles (millions)
 
10,472

 
9,632

 
8.7

 
 
20,093

 
18,294

 
9.8

 
Available seat miles (ASMs) (millions)
 
12,237

 
11,386

 
7.5

 
 
23,656

 
21,805

 
8.5

 
Load factor
 
85.6
%
 
84.6
%
 
1.0

pt.
 
84.9
%
 
83.9
%
 
1.0

pt.
Aircraft utilization (hours per day)
 
12.0

 
12.0

 
0.1

 
 
11.8

 
11.8

 
0.7

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Average fare
 
$
168.85

 
$
167.80

 
0.6

 
 
$
171.29

 
$
167.75

 
2.1

 
Yield per passenger mile (cents)
 
14.28

 
14.25

 
0.2

 
 
14.45

 
14.22

 
1.6

 
Passenger revenue per ASM (cents)
 
12.22

 
12.05

 
1.4

 
 
12.28

 
11.93

 
2.9

 
Operating revenue per ASM (cents)
 
13.17

 
13.12

 
0.4

 
 
13.25

 
13.04

 
1.7

 
Operating expense per ASM (cents)
 
10.86

 
11.88

 
(8.6
)
 
 
10.99

 
12.20

 
(9.9
)
 
Operating expense per ASM, excluding fuel (cents)
 
7.83

 
7.51

 
4.2

 
 
8.00

 
7.79

 
2.7

 
Operating expense per ASM, excluding fuel & profit sharing (cents) (1)
 
7.56

 
7.51

 
0.6

 
 
7.75

 
7.79

 
(0.6
)
 
Airline operating expense per ASM (cents) (2)
 
10.86

 
11.73

 
(7.4
)
 
 
10.99

 
12.03

 
(8.7
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Departures
 
79,558

 
74,917

 
6.2

 
 
153,381

 
143,069

 
7.2

 
Average stage length (miles)
 
1,085

 
1,088

 
(0.3
)
 
 
1,091

 
1,091

 

 
Average number of operating aircraft during period
 
206.0

 
193.9

 
6.3

 
 
205.0

 
193.4

 
6.0

 
Average fuel cost per gallon, including fuel taxes
 
$
2.13

 
$
3.09

 
(30.9
)
 
 
$
2.10

 
$
3.11

 
(32.6
)
 
Fuel gallons consumed (millions)
 
174

 
161

 
8.1

 
 
337

 
309

 
9.0

 
Average number of full-time equivalent employees (2)
 

 

 

 
 
14,223

 
13,162

 
8.1

 
__________________________
(1)
Refer to our “Regulation G Reconciliation” note below for more information on this non-GAAP measure.
(2)
Excludes results of operations and employees of LiveTV, LLC, which are unrelated to our airline operations and are immaterial to our consolidated operating results. As of June 10, 2014, employees of LiveTV, LLC are no longer part of JetBlue.


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Table of Contents

Although we experienced revenue growth throughout 2014 as well as in the first half of 2015, this trend may not continue. Except for the uncertainty related to the direction of fuel prices, we expect our expenses to continue to increase as we acquire additional aircraft, as our fleet ages and as we expand the frequency of flights in existing markets as well as enter into new markets. In addition, we expect our operating results to significantly fluctuate from quarter-to-quarter in the future as a result of various factors, many of which are outside of our control. Consequently, we believe quarter-to-quarter comparisons of our operating results may not necessarily be meaningful; you should not rely on our results for any one quarter as an indication of our future performance.

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
The airline business is capital intensive. Our ability to successfully execute our growth plans is largely dependent on the continued availability of capital on attractive terms. In addition, our ability to successfully operate our business depends on maintaining sufficient liquidity. We believe we have adequate resources from a combination of cash and cash equivalents, investment securities on hand and two available lines of credit. Additionally, as of June 30, 2015, we had 46 unencumbered aircraft and 34 unencumbered spare engines which we believe could be an additional source of liquidity, if necessary.
We believe a healthy liquidity position is crucial to our ability to weather any part of the economic cycle while continuing to execute on our plans for profitable growth and increased returns. Our goal is to continue to be diligent with our liquidity, maintaining financial flexibility and allowing for prudent capital spending.
At June 30, 2015, we had unrestricted cash and cash equivalents of $422 million and short-term investments of $493 million. We believe our current level of unrestricted cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments of approximately 15% of trailing twelve months revenue, combined with our available lines of credit and portfolio of unencumbered assets provides us with a strong liquidity position and the potential for higher returns on cash deployment.
Analysis of Cash Flows
Operating Activities
We rely primarily on operating cash flows to provide working capital for current and future operations. Cash flows from operating activities were $890 million and $541 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, respectively.
Investing Activities
During the six months ended June 30, 2015, capital expenditures related to our purchase of flight equipment included$244 million related to the purchase of six Airbus A321 aircraft, $39 million in work-in-progress relating to flight equipment, $34 million for flight equipment deposits, and $20 million for spare part purchases. Other property and equipment capital expenditures also included ground equipment purchases and facilities improvements for $69 million. Investing activities also included the net purchase of $125 million of investment securities.
During the six months ended June 30, 2014, capital expenditures related to our purchase of flight equipment included $70 million for flight equipment deposits, $50 million related to the purchase of one Airbus A321 aircraft, $19 million for spare part purchases, $29 million in work-in-progress relating to flight equipment and $2 million relating to other activities. Capital expenditures also include the purchase of the Slots at Reagan National Airport for $75 million, other property and equipment including ground equipment purchases and facilities improvements for $115 million and LiveTV inflight entertainment equipment inventory for $20 million. Investing activities also include the proceeds from the sale of LiveTV for $391 million and the net proceeds of $41 million from investment securities.
Financing Activities
Financing activities for the six months ended June 30, 2015 consisted of the scheduled maturities of $94 million relating to debt and capital lease obligations, prepayment of $52 million of outstanding principal relating to seven Airbus A320 aircraft as well as outstanding balance of $32 million on a spe